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2016

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harel175.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- Northwestern University professors Elad Harel and Nathaniel Stern have been selected to receive the prestigious 2016 Young Investigator Awards from the Office of Naval Research (ONR). They are two of 47 scientists from across the nation honored this year by ONR for their exceptionally creative research.

 

Typical grants through the Young Investigator Program are $510,000 over a three-year period with additional funding available for equipment. The funding supports laboratory equipment, graduate student stipends and scholarships and other expenses critical to ongoing and planned investigational studies.

 

The program is one of the oldest and most selective scientific research advancement programs in the country. Its purpose is to fund early-career academic researchers whose scientific pursuits show outstanding promise for supporting the U.S. Department of Defense, while also promoting their professional development.

 

Elad Harel (pictured)

 

Harel, an assistant professor of chemistry in Weinberg, received the honor for his proposal, “Ultrasensitive Multi-Octave and Multi-dimensional Spectral Sensing by Single Element Detection and Compressive Sensing.”

 

Harel focuses on highly interdisciplinary research crossing boundaries into biology, materials chemistry, mathematics and engineering. He is a recognized leader in the field of spectroscopy and imaging of condensed phase chemical and biological systems. Harel’s work in magnetic resonance and optics has enabled him to develop new methods that allow deep insights into how energy flows in materials at the extremes of time and space.

 

Last month, Harel received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers -- the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

 

Nathaniel Stern

 

Stern, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, was named to the program for his proposal, “Multi-Dimensional Control in Laterally Confined Atomically Thin Nanostructures.”

 

Stern’s research focuses on developing methods to use light to study the unique properties of nanoscale systems that emerge from quantum physics. When materials are reduced to their fundamental size limits, new and often counter-intuitive behaviors appear that can be probed and manipulated with high precision using light. Stern’s work will investigate new methods for controlling the dimensionality of nanomaterials barely a single atom thick, which can impact electronic and information technology applications.

 

Among other honors, Stern was selected in 2014 by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science to receive significant research funding as part of the DOE’s highly selective Early Career Research Program.

 

Read more in the Northwestern News Center. >>

hersam-mark.jpgNorthwestern Engineering’s Mark Hersam has been selected as a U.S. Science Envoy by the State Department.

 

As a Science Envoy, Hersam will travel to Eastern Europe to stimulate cooperation in the area of emerging technologies.

 

“It is a great honor to be selected as a U.S. Science Envoy for 2016,” said Hersam, Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering. “I anticipate opportunities to exchange ideas on how to accelerate the transition of fundamental scientific research to economic prosperity through education, entrepreneurship and commercialization.”

 

Hersam, who was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2014, is among five eminent scientists to receive the honor this year. The other recipients are:

 

  • Linda Abriola, professor and former dean at Tufts University School of Engineering
  • Daniel Kammen, distinguished professor of energy at the University of California-Berkeley and founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory
  • Margaret Leinen, director of the Scripps Institutions of Oceanography and vice chancellor for marine sciences at the University of California-San Diego
  • Thomas Lovejoy, professor at George Mason University, senior fellow at the United Nations Foundation, former president of the Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment, and founder of the public television series Nature.


President Barack Obama launched the Science Envoy program in 2009 to demonstrate the United States’ commitment to science, technology and innovation as tools of diplomacy and economic growth. After traveling abroad, Science Envoys advise the White House, the State Department and the scientific community about potential opportunities for collaboration.


Read more in McCormick News. >>

Students_Looking_at_Brain_on_Computer_10689_IMG.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- Nine projects that faculty proposed to support student learning through the innovative use of technology will receive funding for the 2016-2017 school year, according to an announcement by Northwestern University’s Office of the Provost and the Faculty Distance Learning Workgroup.

 

The digital and online projects, including massive open online courses (MOOCs), allow faculty and the University to experiment with modern learning technologies while showcasing Northwestern’s excellence in teaching.

 

Project descriptions follow:

 

“Fostering Effective Online Discussion in Higher Education With ‘Nebula,’ a Graphical Interface for Discussion Boards”

 

The growth of online and blended learning environments has created a greater need for students to interact with one another, engage in higher-order processing of information and develop a sense of community. Online discussion boards have the potential to offer an engaging and social environment for students, but they often fail to live up to expectations in the classroom due, in part, to current design features. Iravani, Contractor and Ng intend to leverage information visualization techniques in the design of a graphical discussion forum interface called “Nebula.” Traditional discussion boards use a linear text-based format that displays posts chronologically; “Nebula” presents discussion as a network graph, in which posts are nodes and replies are the edges that link posts to each other. Their goal is to facilitate collaborative learning through the development of an optimal environment for students to learn from each other. Another goal is to increase contextual learning by having students immerse themselves in classroom material before and after coming to class.

 

“Learning Analytics for Real-time Measure of Student Learning During Lecture in Introductory Materials Science and Engineering Course”

  • Emma DeCosta, lecturer, administration, McCormick
  • Ramille Shah, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, McCormick; department of surgery (transplant division), Feinberg School of Medicine; department of biomedical engineering,McCormick


DeCosta and Shah are taking a new approach to how they co-teach Materials Science 301; their goal with this project is to help students develop a deeper understanding of course material by measuring student learning at multiple points during each lecture and adjusting lecture content and delivery as needed in real time. The plan is to develop a database of questions for use during each lecture, deliver the questions using Learning Catalytics (a real-time classroom engagement, assessment and intelligence system), measure student learning outcomes on a per lecture basis and document common misconceptions. Ultimately, DeCosta and Shah intend to share their questions and feedback with future instructors of the course. The project will offer immediate benefits by increasing student engagement and provide future benefits to instructors of Materials Science 301.


“MOOC: Luther and the West”


Helmer has been awarded funding to offer her course “Luther and the West” as a MOOC. The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, and Helmer’s course grows out of the exciting and dynamic international religious environment as scholars around the world are searching for new understandings of Luther in light of present-day circumstances. This MOOC will be the only online course that is offered that specifically addresses Luther’s vast contributions to the modern west. As one of the leading experts on Luther working today, Helmer will bring a worldwide interest to the course and will increase Northwestern’s position as a leader in the historical study of religion in a way that promotes understanding and tolerance.


“The Chinese Student Diaspora in America: A Multicultural, Multilingual and Multimedia Storytelling Project”


In her course, Hopgood will bring together a team of domestic and international students at Northwestern to study, investigate and tell the stories of Chinese students who leave their families, homes, jobs and country to study in the U.S. Students will be studying the history and realities of a diverse group that is often overlooked and misunderstood. Participants will report in Mandarin, Cantonese and English, and will pitch stories to The New York Times, one of the most influential media groups that is also experimenting in multilingual journalism. By having students engage in crosscultural and multilingual interviewing and story production for different media platforms, Hopgood hopes to further Medill’s dedication to finding innovative ways to enable and empower collaboration and learning among students of diverse backgrounds.


“Design and Fabrication of Embedded Electronic Devices”

  • Ilya Mikhelson, lecturer of electrical engineering and computer science, McCormick


Mikhelson is developing a course to address the gap between theory and practice in engineering, specifically by giving students the necessary tools to make an idea into a reality. In one fast-paced course, students will take a Web camera prototype from inception to completion, incorporating circuit design, 3-D printing, firmware programming, Internet connectivity, mobile development and Web development. By the end of the course, students will be able to take a problem they would like to solve, create a solution and implement it elegantly in both hardware and software. With industry trends towards connected, low-power devices, the skills Mikhelson will teach will be a valuable asset in the post-college job search.


“Arabic for Media, Linguistic Choices by Media Professionals”


The Arabic for Media course has been offered at NU-Q since 2009 and is aimed at informing the linguistic choices and decision-making processes of media professionals. By “flipping” the course, Ouanaimi’s approach to this class will address the difficulty of addressing the theoretical components in the traditional 90-minute session. Ouanaimi intends to offer course content online via carefully designed instructional interactive videos; this will allow students to spend class time more productively discussing the practical implications of the theory and examining authentic media products. NU-Q is already training top-notch media professionals who function in the Middle East, but Ouanaimi is confident that this course will further establish NU-Q’s connection to the market and raise the school’s profile locally and regionally.


“Flipped French: Adaptive Grammar”

  • Christiane Rey, associate professor of instruction of French and Italian, Weinberg
  • Patricia Scarampi, associate professor of instruction of French and Italian, Weinberg
  • Aude Raymond, senior lecturer of French and Italian, Weinberg


By developing digital tools for a grammar and exercises component of a second-year French course, Raymond, Rey and Scarampi aim to free class time for communicative activities and to improve students’ comprehension and retention of the material by providing an approach tailored to individual levels, needs and styles. Their work this year will build upon their work from prior years when, supported by Hewlett grants, they began development of an online textbook. The features explored this year will make the study of French grammar significantly more interactive, more efficient, more effective and fun. The kinds of features proposed in this project -- specifically the sequencing of grammar and exercises, incorporation of tailored feedback and an interface for instructors -- do not currently exist on the market and represent a significant development that will help students to better assimilate material.


“Experience-based and Analytics-informed, Online Resources for a Flipped-classroom ‘Introduction to Scientific Computing in the Physical Sciences’ Course”


In an effort to better align course content with students’ needs and expectations, van der Lee is developing online course modules that will allow her to “flip” instructional content to actively engage students with the subject matter. By updating an existing framework in Canvas with experience-based, analytics-informed and research-supported content, the modules developed in this class will continue to exist and can be re-used on demand. These innovative modules have the potential to remain relevant because they are easy to adapt to both technological developments and evolving student needs.


“Pair Research: Matching People for Collaboration, Learning and Productivity”


Collaboration and seeking help boost productivity and produce better research, yet few mechanisms exist for orchestrating such behaviors among undergraduate and graduate student researchers. Zhang and Gerber, co-director of Delta Lab, have been experimenting with a new kind of interaction within and across research groups that they call “pair research.” Each week, members of a group of Northwestern undergraduate students, graduate students and faculty are paired up by a matching algorithm and meet for a one- or two-hour session to work on each other’s projects. The following week, different pairs are formed and the process repeats. Zhang and Gerber intend to develop a Web-based platform for pair research that will incorporate features to help inform pairings over time and allow students to proactively suggest opportunities for collaboration and learning. This project will build on the successes of their early pilot deployments by advancing new learning technologies and developing a platform to broadly support the use of pair research in a variety of settings, both in and outside the classroom.


Read more in Northwestern News. >>

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Northwestern's Class of 1879.


One of the major sources of Northwestern news is now available online thanks to a large digitization initiative at Northwestern University Libraries. All Northwestern alumni publications published between 1903 and 1987 are now viewable in HathiTrust, a collection of millions of titles digitized from libraries around the world


This collection of the University’s official alumni publications is fully text searchable, making research easy for historians, alumni and genealogists. Previously, these publications were available only in physical form in University Archives. The index for these publications was far from complete, however, and without a precise date to go by, researchers could face a long and frustrating hunt.


“The greatest source of information about a university is its student newspaper, but a close second is its alumni publications,” said University archivist Kevin Leonard. “We reference the alumni publications all the time; now we’ll be using them even more and to greater effect.”


The publications, and their links in the HathiTrust site, are:


Alumni News-Letter (1903-1914)

Alumni Journal (1914-1921)

Northwestern University Alumni News (1921 – 1969)

Northwestern Alumni News (1971-1987)


HathiTrust is a collaboration of the 13 universities of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the University of California system, and the University of Virginia, and currently includes digitized volumes from the University of Michigan, University of California, Indiana University and the University of Wisconsin. The HathiTrust partners are committed to developing the repository and its services to meet the long-term needs of their academic communities, and offer a unique resource on the Web for scholarship and research.


To read the original story, visit Northwestern University Libraries' website.

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A still frame from Christina Paschyn's award-winning documentary, "A Struggle for Home: The Crimean Tatars."

"A Struggle for Home: The Crimean Tatars," written and directed by Christina M. Paschyn '07, '07 MS, a Medill graduate and lecturer in journalism at Northwestern University in Qatar, has taken the Best International Film Award at the DC Independent Film festival in Washington, DC.

paschyn-christina.jpgThe film, which has also been honored with a Silver Award from the 2015 Spotlight Documentary Awards and a 2015 IndieFest Award of Merit – Special Mention, is Paschyn’s (right) first feature-length documentary.  

"A Struggle for Home" examines the rich and often tragic history of the Crimean Tatar people, the Muslim-Turkic indigenous population of the Crimean Peninsula. In the time since the Russian Empire conquered the peninsula in 1783, the Tatars have struggled to reclaim their home from Russian domination. When the Soviet Union collapsed, many Tatars thought they finally would be free and secure in their own land. But in February 2014, those dreams were dashed when Russian President Vladimir Putin invaded and re-annexed the peninsula.

“When I traveled to Crimea in 2012, everyone I interviewed, including Pro-Russian activists, had told me that a Russian takeover of the peninsula would never happen, or at least was extremely unlikely,” said Paschyn, a Ukrainian-American filmmaker and multimedia journalist.

“Then in 2014, the unthinkable did occur. I knew my project would be incomplete if I didn’t change my focus. I needed to chronicle the many twists and turns that the Crimean Tatars’ long struggle for freedom and national autonomy has taken throughout the centuries.”

The documentary premiered at the Al Jazeera International Documentary Film Festival in November 2015 and will be screened next at the Silver Springs International Film Festival in Ocala, Florida, on April 6. The film was co-produced by Paschyn Productions and Mediadante. More information is available at astruggleforhome.com.

Paschyn has reported for major news organizations across the globe, including Euronews, the Christian Science Monitor, Time.com and Time magazine, the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, Al-Fanar Media and Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, among other publications.

Paschyn earned both a bachelor's degree and master's degree in broadcast journalism from the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications in Evanston in 2007. She also earned a master's degree in Middle East Studies from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev as a Rotary International Ambassadorial Scholar. She speaks Ukrainian fluently and is studying Arabic.


To read the original story, go to NU-Q's website.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) recognized the success of Northwestern University’s institutional partnership with Sciences Po in Paris at its annual awards ceremony in California this past weekend.

 

Northwestern’s International Program Development is among nine winners of the 2016 IIE Andrew Heiskell Awards for Innovation in International Education.


The awards honor the most outstanding initiatives in international higher education among member campuses of the IIE Network. IIE’s membership association consists of more than 1,400 higher education institutions.


The Heiskell Awards showcase the most innovative and successful models for internationalizing the campus, study abroad and international partnership programs in practice today. A particular emphasis is placed on initiatives that remove institutional barriers and broaden the base of participation in study abroad and promote international teaching and learning on campus.


This year’s awards highlight nine initiatives: five campuses will receive the Heiskell Award, and four more will be recognized with honorable mentions.

Northwestern will receive an honorable mention in the International Partnerships category.


Other winners include Florida International University, Case Western Reserve University, Temple University, the University of Illinois at Urbana in Champaign, the University of Iowa, Sacred Heart University, State University of New York at Oswego and Tennessee State University.


Northwestern’s partnership with Sciences Po is a pillar of the University’s globalization strategy: multidimensional partnerships with foreign institutions that can expand and deepen over time.


The partnership began with student exchanges and a joint study abroad program on European Union studies, followed by public health and critical theory programs that admit students from both partner campuses.


The universities then developed dual Ph.D. and faculty exchanges in several disciplines, resulting in research collaborations, joint conferences and the recent development of joint programs in law and integrated marketing communications (Medill).


The creation of specially-designed, thematic Northwestern study abroad programs at Sciences Po created an international infrastructure for programs abroad, which allowed for the development of similar programs in Mexico, South Africa and China.


This led other departments to explore possibilities in their own disciplines, resulting in expanded opportunities (exchanges and specially-designed programs) in engineering, global health, medicine, economic and political development, and environmental studies.


IIE will present the award at a March 11 ceremony as part of its annual Best Practices in Internationalization Conference for campus professionals held this year at the University of California, Davis.


View the original story here.

Twenty Northwestern University in Qatar students have undertaken the school’s annual journalism and public relation internship program with leading media institutions in the United States, Europe and the Middle East. The program provides students with the opportunity to work fulltime for, with, and alongside veteran journalists or public relations practitioners in professional environments.

“The goal of this program,” said D. Charles Whitney, associate dean for academic affairs, “is for students to get the kinds of hands-on experience that helps them develop new skills, test old skills, work under deadline pressure, hone their news judgment, sharpen their fact-checking and research skills, build confidence in their capabilities and explore new career paths not previously considered. This is a wonderful and unique opportunity offered by Northwestern.”

“This program,” said Everette E. Dennis, dean and CEO of Northwestern University in Qatar, “offers our students an opportunity to get hands-on experience in the global media world. Working at prestigious media outlets such as the Huffington Post and Forbes magazine, as well as global public relation firms, including Grayling and Rubicon, students learn more about the many opportunities open to them as graduates of Northwestern University.”

Shakeeb Asrar, a journalism junior who will be interning at USA Today, hopes to supplement his knowledge of the news media with real-life experience. “I am really excited for my internship and have been looking forward to it since joining NU-Q,” he said. “I will finally be able to apply lessons from the classroom in a professional newsroom and hopefully get my work published.”

Assigned to Blue Rubicon, a public relations firm in London, Nayab Malik, a journalism/PR student, is experiencing her second overseas opportunity with NU-Q. Last summer, Malik was chosen to participate in a program offered by Northwestern--Engage Chicago (Chicago House), which is an eight-week residential summer program for outstanding undergraduate students. With the journalism residency program, Malik is hoping that it will “prepare me for life after college, when I start working. I hope to be able to adapt to this new place so that in the future, I can adapt wherever I'm sent to work or live.”

View the full story here.

The Buffett Institute’s Global Engagement Studies Institute (GESI) study abroad program has won an award from Ashoka U for its innovative educational approach to social entrepreneurship in higher education.

Ashoka U fosters social innovation in higher edPatrick Eccles, associate director of global engagement programs at the Buffett Institute, accepted the Ashoka U-Cordes Innovation Award on behalf of GESI on February 26, 2016. The award was presented during the Ashoka U Exchange in New Orleans to an audience of more than 700 leaders in social innovation in higher education.

“[The Ashoka U-Cordes Innovation Award] casts a broad net and identifies the best and brightest innovations that are really affecting the ability of our students to be change makers,” says Ron Cordes, co-founder of the Cordes Foundation, in a press release.

GESI is a credit-bearing program that combines rigorous academic training and hands-on international fieldwork. Teams of GESI students partner with local grassroots organizations in six countries to help design and implement community-based development projects. One of the program’s core values is a commitment to diversity and inclusion: In 2015, over 70% of GESI students were from underrepresented groups.

GESI's on the ground partners operate all over the world

Over the past six years, the Ashoka-U Cordes Innovation Awards have recognized 35 top educational approaches in social entrepreneurship within higher education. Innovation Awardees are selected based on three criteria:

  • Innovation – Does this model address a clear challenge or opportunity for advancing an entrepreneurial or socially impactful mindset for the university context?
  • Replication – Can the model be easily adapted without losing quality and impact?
  • Maturity – Is there evidence of refinement and iteration of the model over time?

GESI’s commitment to global partnerships and community-based learning has helped it stand out from other study abroad programs.

View the full story here.

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The final whistle of the Outback Bowl brought the careers of several Wildcats seniors to an end, but Northwestern opened spring ball February 23 with a new group seeking its own identity.


Episode 3 of The Hunt -- a behind-the-scenes look at the Wildcats -- focuses on offensive lineman Ben Oxley and wide receivers Solomon Vault and Marcus McShepard as they hone their skills at new positions this spring.


View the latest episode on NUSports.com.

Friday Feature Talent Show


Acts from Wildcats baseball, lacrosse and volleyball took home awards at the 2016 Student-Athlete Talent Show, presented by the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (S.A.A.C.), on March 7 at Cahn Auditorium.  Proceeds from the event contributed to more than $6,500 raised by student-athletes in support of 2016 Northwestern Dance Marathon beneficiary Blessings In A Backpack this year.

 

Seniors Austin Carr of the football team, and Spring Sanders from lacrosse hosted the show. The night opened with a video montage of their exhaustive training for the role, preparation that paid off throughout the evening as they entertained the audience, interviewed acts and had the honor of presenting the show's awards at the conclusion.

But the decision on who deserved those awards was left to the show's three judges; Deputy Director of Athletics Brian Baptiste, Assistant Director of Athletics Jane Wagner and reigning Student-Athlete Talent Show champion Mike Trucco, a 2015 Northwestern graduate.

 

The trio was treated to 12 acts representing nine varsity programs, and performances that ranged from music to poetry to a fully-uniformed Rubik's Cube battle.

 

Monday's top overall prize went to senior Jake Stolley and freshman Jake Garbarino of the baseball team, who performed an original, arranged medley of songs with the former on ukulele and the latter accompanying on tambourine.

 

Garbarino felt fortunate to take home top honors in his rookie year.

 

"I had an amazing time doing my first talent show," said the freshman. "I had no clue what to expect, but [teammate Jake Stolley and I] prepared so I'd feel confident at the show, I couldn't have done it without him. The rest of the acts were amazing, especially Austin Carr's performance. I couldn't believe it when we were called for the best overall performance, I can't wait to do it again next year."

 

View the full story here.

Tory LindleyTory Lindley, Northwestern's associate athletic director and director of athletic training services, has received the Great Lakes Athletic Trainers' Association's (GLATA) Golden Pinnacle Award, the association's highest honor. He received the award March 11 during GLATA's awards ceremony.

 

"Tory Lindley is at the core of Northwestern's belief in student-athlete well-being as its paramount priority, and his dedication to the health and safety of our Wildcats is unwavering," said Jim Phillips, Northwestern's vice president for athletics and recreation. "Tory and his staff have been innovators, both in research and in practice, on the leading edge of an industry that is constantly evolving. He is among the nation's most respected professionals in his field, and we are sincerely fortunate to have him on our team."

 

Lindley joined Northwestern in 2002 and, in addition to serving as the head athletic trainer for Wildcats football, oversees all athletic training services for NU's 19 varsity programs. He has been consistently recognized for his contributions to the field, honored as Division I Head Athletic Trainer of the Year by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) in 2012 and inducted into the Illinois Athletic Trainers' Hall of Fame in 2011. He currently serves as a NATA Board Member and district director.

 

Lindley earned his bachelor of science in education with a specialization in athletic training from Michigan State University and went on to receive a master's degree from the University of Minnesota. In addition to professional experience at both institutions, Lindley has worked at Eastern Michigan University and Hamline University, as well as with the New York Giants, Washington Redskins and Houston Oilers. 

 

View the original story here.

r_crown_clock_IMG_0566.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. -- Employees with autism shared their on-the-job experiences as part of the Autism Speaks Midwest Employee Symposium March 12 at Northwestern University.

 

The daylong event at the Norris Center brought together people with autism, families, researchers, business owners, entrepreneurs and others to help address employment issues for adults with autism.

 

It’s estimated that 85 percent of adults with autism in the United States are currently unemployed or underemployed, a major concern in the autism community. Among young adults between 21 and 26 years old, only 50 percent have ever had a paid job outside of their household, according to Autism Speaks.

 

In opening remarks at the symposium, Molly Losh, associate professor and director of Northwestern’s Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Lab, and Denise Boggs Eisenhauer, a certified speech language pathologist, highlighted Northwestern’s dedication to the autism community through research, clinical services and strong community partnerships.

 

Working closely with local and national advocacy organizations, Losh started a Northwestern-based chapter of Project Search. The program places senior high-school students with autism in internships throughout the University to prepare them to enter the workforce after graduation.

 

Eisenhauer directs Northwestern’s Center for Audiology, Speech, Language, and Learning (NUCASSL), which offers a developmental diagnostic clinic for children ages zero to three who present with concerns related to social communication.

 

The event featureed several businesses that employ people with autism, including:

 

  • 100% Wine, a St. Louis-based company that donates all profits to nonprofit organizations working to create jobs for people with a disability.
  • Highland Park’s Aspirtech, which provides domestic software testing services.
  • Sugar and Spice Extraordinary Sweet Treats in Evanston, which hires young adults with disabilities and runs a workplace training program for people with autism.

 

The Autism Speaks Midwest Employment Symposium was co-sponsored by Northwestern’s Center for Audiology, Speech, Language, and Learning (NUCASLL) and the Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Lab in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders.

 

In recognition of World Autism Awareness Day, Northwestern’s 100-foot clock tower, which stands in the middle of the Rebecca Crown Center, will glow blue on April 2.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

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DOHA, Qatar --- Independent Arab films are twice as likely to have female directors and originate in a far wider range of countries than their mainstream cinema counterparts, according to one of the findings of a new report on Middle East media by Northwestern University in Qatar (NU-Q), in partnership with the Doha Film Institute (DFI).

 

Once considered narrow and stagnant, the media industry is expanding and diversifying in the Middle East, according to the region-wide study, “Media Industries in the Middle East, 2016.”

 

Overall, the report points to a general expansion of channels and offerings across all platforms, including broadcast, print and digital media. The new content also was created by a broader diversity of producers, not usually associated with this industry in the Middle East.

 

“In the past few years, television channels in the region have expanded in number and in the diversity of content they carry,” said study co-author Robb Wood, director of strategic partnerships at NU-Q. “Much of the growth comes from traditional television delivered over the Internet.”

 

That’s a key finding because channels have become increasingly dependent on revenues from video-on-demand services, and Netflix has recently entered the Middle East, “rattling the market for content already,” Wood said.

 

The report is the first in several years to provide systematic and comprehensive information about the dynamics of the media and communication industries in the Middle East and in North Africa -- the MENA region--and its key characteristics.

 

Highlights of the analysis include:

 

  • Pay TV subscriptions in the region grew by two-thirds from 2010-2015.
  • Arabic is under-represented as a share of the world’s websites and over-represented as a share of the world’s most popular social media pages.
  • While the majority of religious channels in the region remain Sunni-affiliated, Shia and Christian channels have more than doubled since 2011.
  • Newspaper circulation has increased since 2010 despite sharply declining revenues.

 

Read news summary.

 

Read the full study.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

brain.jpgCHICAGO --- The recent ability to peer into the brain of living individuals with a rare type of language dementia, primary progressive aphasia (PPA), provides important new insights into the beginning stages of this disease -- which results in language loss -- when it is caused by a buildup of a toxic protein found in Alzheimer’s disease.

 

The research also offers additional insight into why this type of dementia causes people to lose the ability to express themselves and understand language.

 

Using a special imaging technique, Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered the toxic build-up of amyloid protein is greater on the left side of the brain -- the site of language processing -- than on the right side in many individuals living with PPA.

 

Previously, amyloid accumulation in the brain could only be studied after an individual with Alzheimer’s disease had died. This snapshot in time was after the disease had run its full course, and amyloid had spread throughout the entire brain. Now, a new technology called Amyloid PET Imaging allows researchers to study the build-up of the toxic amyloid during life.


“By understanding where these proteins accumulate first and over time, we can better understand the course of the disease and where to target treatment,” said Emily Rogalski, the lead study investigator and research associate professor at Northwestern’s Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center (CNADC).

 

The goal is to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease during life in order to guide treatment and identify regions to target for future drug trials.

 

“This new technology is very exciting for Alzheimer’s research,” said Adam Martersteck, the first author and a graduate student in Northwestern’s neuroscience program. “Not only can we tell if a person is likely or unlikely to have Alzheimer’s disease causing their PPA, but we can see where it is in the brain. By understanding what the brain looks like in the beginning stages of Alzheimer’s, we hope to be able to diagnose people earlier and with better accuracy.”

 

This is the first study to examine and compare beta-amyloid buildup in the brain using the Amyvid amyloid PET imaging tracer between individuals with PPA and those with Alzheimer’s memory dementia, the more common disease that causes memory problems. Both types of dementia (memory and language) can be caused by an accumulation of beta-amyloid, an abnormal toxic protein in the brain.

 

By using Amyloid PET Imaging, Northwestern scientists at CNADC showed the toxic amyloid protein was distributed differently in people that had the PPA language dementia versus the memory dementia in the early stages. Researchers found there was more amyloid in the left hemisphere parietal region of individuals with PPA compared to those with Alzheimer’s memory dementia.

 

Scientists scanned 32 PPA patients, and 19 of them had high amounts of amyloid and were likely to have the Alzheimer’s pathology. They were compared to 22 people who had the Alzheimer’s memory dementia. Those with the memory dementia had the same amount of amyloid on the left and right side of the brain.

 

The study was published recently in the Annals of Neurology.

 

The paper is titled “Is in vivo Amyloid Distribution Asymmetric in Primary Progressive Aphasia?"

 

The research was funded by grant DC008552 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, grant AG13854 from the National Institute on Aging, grant NS075075 from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, all of the National Institutes of Health.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

Jim Phillips Stephen Buckley Nebraska 2015

Northwestern University Vice President for Athletics and Recreation Jim Phillips has been selected as one of four Under Armour Athletic Directors of the Year in the Football Bowl Subdivision, the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) announced.

 

"In the 18-year history of this program, we have honored over 400 directors of athletics from each segment of the NACDA membership," said Bob Vecchione, NACDA Executive Director. "I would like to congratulate the 2015-16 Under Armour ADOY class of award winners, and look forward to continuing this tradition of honoring the outstanding leadership in our profession for many years to come."

 

"The Athletics Director of the Year Award honors those men and women who are visionary leaders in college athletics," said Nick Carparelli, Under Armour senior director of college sports. "Under Armour is proud to partner with NACDA to facilitate this recognition for the top athletics directors across all divisions."

 

During Phillips' tenure the Wildcats have been national leaders in all academic metrics, and set records in the classroom institutionally. Northwestern's 507 student-athletes combined for a record 3.29 grade point average in the fall, and a school-record 15 of Northwestern's 19 varsity athletic programs received Public Recognition Awards in 2015 as part of the NCAA's Academic Progress Rate program, the highest total in both Northwestern and Big Ten Conference history.

 

Northwestern student-athletes have achieved 100 percent participation in community service and combined to dedicate more than 5,500 hours of service to the Evanston and Chicago communities over the last year.

 

In competition, Northwestern has achieved historic success. During Phillips' time in Evanston, women's lacrosse, softball, men's golf, women's golf, women's fencing, men's soccer, women's tennis, field hockey and wrestling all have won team or individual conference championships. Wildcats football has reached a program-record 10 wins in two of the last four seasons.

 

Northwestern has seen unprecedented facilities growth under Phillips' leadership, particularly over the last year. In November 2015, NU broke ground on Ryan Fieldhouse and the Walter Athletics Center, part of a transformational lakefront complex featuring a large, indoor multipurpose facility as well as a new home for academic support services, a nutrition and dining facility, a sports performance center and athletic training and sports medicine facilities.

 

In addition, competition venues for soccer, lacrosse and baseball have been completely overhauled in the last year. Lanny and Sharon Martin Stadium for lacrosse and soccer, and the new Rocky & Berenice Miller Park for baseball, will both open this month.

 

Beyond his responsibilities in Evanston, Phillips was elected by his peers as the inaugural chairman of the NCAA Division I Council, and is the first-ever sitting athletic director to serve on the NCAA Board of Directors. He also is the immediate past president of NACDA.

 

All NACDA-member directors of athletics in the United States, Canada and Mexico who met the criteria were eligible for the award. Among the criteria were service as an AD for a minimum of five academic years; demonstration of commitment to higher education and student-athletes; continuous teamwork, loyalty and excellence; and the ability to inspire individuals or groups to high levels of accomplishments. Additionally, each AD's institution must have passed a compliance check through its appropriate governing body (i.e., NCAA, NAIA, etc.), in which the institution could not have been on probation or cited for a lack of institutional control within the last five years during the tenure of the current athletics director.


To read the original story, visit NUSports.com.

424514307_773e478133_m.jpgWithin just a couple of years, inflight WiFi has moved from a luxury to a near commodity for most continental flights. Prices for the service range as widely as their apparent performance. In one extreme, JetBlue recently announced it will make WiFi available for free. With other airlines, a monthly access plan can set you back as much as $50.


“That’s the same price as a month of broadband access at home,” said Northwestern Engineering’s Fabián Bustamante. “And, during a flight, the connection is more similar to dial-up.”

Bustamante, who is a professor of computer science at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering, and his team are working to better understand the systems challenges for inflight WiFi. They expect this could lead to new approaches for improving current consumer service and potentially revolutionize the antiquated communication services that support the global air-traffic management system.

The team presented its preliminary work and their vision for such changes on Tuesday, February 23 at the 17th annual International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications in St. Augustine, Florida. John Rula, a PhD student in Bustamante’s lab, is lead author of the study. The work was done in collaboration with David Choffnes, assistant professor of computer science at Northeastern University and an alumnus of Bustamante’s lab.

Since first appearing in late 2004, inflight WiFi has grown to become an important component of airlines’ revenue. A recent Honeywell survey found that 85 percent of passengers used inflight WiFi from 2013 to 2014, and 66 percent of them selected flights based on WiFi availability.

While the idea of inflight WiFi has rapidly become popular, the complaints about the quality of existing services have also increased. Bustamante’s team has built an application called Wi-Fly that measures Internet connectivity during flights. Using this application, Bustamante and his team have found that inflight WiFi is slower than using a dial-up modem. Loading a single webpage, in fact, often took an excruciating 30 to 35 seconds.

“This is not particularly surprising,” Rula said. “Flying presents one of the most challenging conditions for continuous WiFi activity because the flights are six miles in the air. They are moving at 500 to 600 miles per hour. From a network perspective, that’s incredibly challenging.”

Typical inflight WiFi configurations include multiple WiFi access points connected to an onboard server, which is linked to the ground via satellite or cell towers. Both options require the signal to travel over great distances before bouncing back to mobile devices on the airplane. When cell towers are not nearby — such as when flying over an ocean — connectivity is even worse, if not impossible.

Bustamante and his team hope that new, crowdsourced data can offer a deeper understanding of the quality of service experienced by customers, their main problems, and potential solutions. After purchasing inflight WiFi, passengers can access the Wi-Fly site to receive a live view of the performance they experience, which is mapped over their route. At the same time, they can contribute valuable data to Bustamante’s research.

Peter Civetta

Peter Civetta leads Northwestern's Office of Undergraduate Research at a time of explosive growth in opportunities for students. Photo by Jim Prisching


How can we boost memory during sleep? Is there a way to 3-D print clean energy tools? What would it take to make theater more inviting to children with special needs? These are among the questions tackled in recent undergraduate research projects at Northwestern.

 

The University has expanded undergraduate research in recent years to give more students the chance to test their problem-solving skills in the real world. In fact, students received almost $1 million in funding from the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) last year compared to $200,000 a decade ago, before the office existed.


Traditionally, most undergraduate research has occurred in science labs where the infrastructure is already in place. But today’s funding boost reflects Northwestern’s mission to fund projects relevant to whatever subject area a student finds most interesting and relevant.


“This summer we funded a project in New York City for a student who wants to direct musical theater on Broadway,” said Peter Civetta, director of OUR. “There is no curriculum for that, so the student tapped the vast Northwestern alumni network and talked to people with that job title to create a resource for others with similar ambitions. We want every student to know that these opportunities exist.”


Once reserved for faculty and graduate students, research opportunities have changed the nature of the college experience by providing a “counterbalance,” as Civetta puts it, to the short bursts of learning that happen day-by-day throughout the year.


“We challenge students to immerse themselves in a singular question that stirs their passions and then to dig deeper for answers than they ever could in class,” Civetta said. “They have to think and collaborate in new ways in order to add meaningful knowledge to the world.”


The Office of Undergraduate Research provided funding for more than 400 student projects last year in the form of academic year and summer research, language immersion, conference travel and faculty research assistance.


The growth in funding over the past decade also reflects a key pillar of Northwestern Will, the University’s strategic plan, which highlights student learning integrated with experiences beyond the classroom.


In the last of a series of profiles exploring undergraduate research at Northwestern, Civetta talks to Northwestern News about the program. See the full story here.

McGaw_Sign_02.jpgOut-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado -- which has legally allowed sales of the drug in retail dispensaries since 2014 -- are ending up in the emergency room at an increasing rate, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

 

“Emergency room visits related to cannabis use have increased more dramatically among out-of-state visitors than among Colorado residents,” said lead investigator Dr. Howard Kim, a postdoctoral fellow in emergency medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and an emergency medicine physician at Northwestern Medicine. “This may indicate that out-of-state visitors are unprepared for the adverse effects of marijuana use.”


Kim began the study when he was a resident at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.


The finding has implications for other states in which recreational marijuana is legal, such as Alaska, Oregon and Washington.


The study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine print issue on February 25, 2016.


Adverse effects of marijuana use may include psychiatric symptoms such as anxiety, hallucinations and altered mental status; cardiovascular symptoms such as a fast heart rate, high blood pressure or palpitations; and gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain and vomiting.


Although the investigators did not study if visitors to the emergency room used primarily edible or smoked cannabis products, edible products such as cookies or brownies often have a delayed effect, which could lead to overdosing, Kim said.


“People eating marijuana products often don’t feel any effect immediately, leading them to eat another edible,” Kim said. “Then they’ve ingested multiple products, so when the effect finally kicks in, it is much stronger.”


In addition, the content of edible products is highly variable, so users don’t know the potency of what they are eating.


Out-of-state visitors to the emergency room for marijuana-related symptoms accounted for 78 per 10,000 emergency room visits in 2012 compared to 163 per 10,000 visits in 2014 -- an increase of 109 percent. Among Colorado residents, the number of marijuana-related visits was 70 per 10,000 in 2012 compared to 101 per 10,000 in 2014, a 44 percent increase. The research took place in the emergency department of UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital.


“Anecdotally, we noticed that most out-of-towners were in Colorado for other reasons, such as visiting friends or on business,” Kim said. “They ended up in the ER because they decided to try some marijuana.” Most patients got supportive care and went home after a few hours, but some were admitted for further observation.


“Everyone needs to be aware of the side effects of marijuana use,” said senior author Dr. Andrew Monte, assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “These results underscore the importance of educating the public and especially any visitors to marijuana-legal states on safe and appropriate use of cannabis products.”

Monte said the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment's "Good to Know" campaign has improved education of users across the state, reflected in lower rates of emergency department visits among Colorado residents.


In addition, new regulations in Colorado require training on responsible use for budtenders, as cannabis dispensary workers are known. These efforts aim to decrease adverse effects for all users, including those with less knowledge and experience.

Kim and Monte recommend that any states considering liberalizing marijuana policies should implement pre-emptive public health education campaigns.


To read the original story, visit the Northwestern News Center.


More than 1,000 Northwestern students danced for 30 hours straight beginning March 4 as part of the University’s 42nd annual Dance Marathon, one of the largest student-run fundraising events in the country. This year’s event raised more than $1.2 million for Blessings in a Backpack and the Evanston Community Foundation.

 

Nicola_DM.JPGNicola Traynor (at far right in photo), a Medill sophomore from Riverside, Connecticut, participated in Dance Marathon for the first time this year. Here’s her first-hand account of one of Northwestern’s most fun – and most exhausting – traditions.


By Nicola Traynor ’18

 

Thirty hours is a really long time.

 

This sounds obvious, sure, but there’s nothing quite like being there and realizing what the next 30 hours of your life will look like. There will be no sleep. There will be almost no rest. For the next 30 hours, there is just you, and this tent, and all the people around you who are just as sleep deprived and exhausted as you. For the next 30 hours it will not be up to you when you eat or sit down or stop dancing. And it will all be worth it for that moment at the end, when they unveil the total money raised and you realize how huge of an impact this event truly has. This is the Northwestern University Dance Marathon.


My freshman year, my roommate and I opted out of Dance Marathon, choosing Netflix and pizza in our dorm room instead. On that Saturday afternoon (the event runs from 7 p.m. Friday to 1 a.m. Sunday), I ventured to the tent outside Norris to visit some of my friends who had opted to participate. They were lagging, they were tired, and the tent reeked of sweat and humidity. And yet the energy in the tent was contagious. I felt relieved that after my visit I could leave and return to the comfort of my bed, but I also felt like I was missing out on a really important event for the Northwestern community. 


So as a sophomore, I felt like I needed to give Dance Marathon the old college try. I registered in the fall, and before I knew it, it was time to get dancing.


Well, that’s not actually entirely true, because a lot goes into Dance Marathon before the weekend itself finally arrives. There are months of events and fundraising to prepare and raise money. I became the group leader for my team, Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed community service fraternity. I found my own excitement and motivation growing as I contacted more and more people to reach my fundraising goal and even after I reached my goal, not wanting to give up as March 4 became closer and closer. I enjoyed leading a small team and encouraging and supporting my team members in the weeks leading up to the event.


Dance Marathon’s primary beneficiary this year, Blessings in a Backpack, promotes food stability to end childhood hunger. The organization packs backpacks full of food for children from low-income families to take home over the weekends so they won’t go hungry and will instead be able to focus and succeed in school. Dance Marathon’s secondary beneficiary, the Evanston Community Foundation, works to benefit and support our local community. Both of these causes felt inseparable from the Dance Marathon experience: the entire event was anchored around how much these organizations matter, and how much we wanted to help by raising money for them. Just $100 can feed a child for an entire year, and $400— the fundraising requirement for each dancer—can feed four children for a year. There was something so concrete about this concept that made it feel like every dollar mattered, that every extra dollar meant another child would get to eat.


The event itself can only be described as impressively organized chaos. There’s constant movement all over the tent, where over a thousand students converge together; all over the stage, where the student emcees help lead the event and usher different speakers and groups onto the stage; and behind the scenes in Norris, where committee members work to make the event run smoothly, from productions to food to helping bring groups of students to the bathrooms.


On Saturday morning, the finance committee took the stage. Our fundraising goal inside the tent, they announced, was to raise $10,000 in 10 hours. We had to contact anyone we could, anyone who was left, to keep raising money. This was the final push. I sent an almost incoherent string of text messages trying to get everyone I knew to donate. A few hours later the committee announced that an anonymous corporate donor would give $10,000 more if we managed to raise $25,000 in the tent. We raised over $30,000, which jumped to over $40,000 thanks to the anonymous donation. There was a thrill each time the committee took the stage to announce our progress. We were still raising money, and this time—our time in the tent—could still be used to make a difference. This was about more than just reaching our fundraising goals. This was about pushing past everything we thought was possible, past our own physical and mental restrictions as we raised every dollar and cent we could.


All over the tent students were jumping and dancing and waving their hands around. Above, condensation began to form and drip down from the constant heat and humidity, known as when it “rains sweat.” Below, food crumbs were crushed into dust from the snacks we consumed while dancing in the tent. Food became simple fuel, consumed only for energy and to make up for calories burned. Taste became meaningless by the time lunch rolled around on Saturday afternoon, when I scarfed down a ham and cheese sandwich while walking back into the tent.


Every three hours there is a 15 minute break, when dancers flow from the tent out to the various rooms in Norris that had been turned into changing rooms. Time is scarce and decisions have to be made. You can use the time to peel the sweaty socks off your feet and change into a costume that fits the next block’s theme. All around the edge of the McCormick Auditorium, where I found myself between block changes, people would lie with their backs to the floor and their feet straight up in the air, their heels leaning against the wall. This is meant to drain the blood from your feet, to reduce swelling in as little time as possible. The break always ends too soon.


There are moments when it is painful, when your legs ache and your feet cramp and you’re tired and the music feels too loud and the tent feels too crowded. There are moments when the energy in the tent feels low, especially in the lengthy middle of an even lengthier chunk of time. But it’s all worth it for Block 10, the final three hours. It’s worth it when the student leaders take the stage and announce that we’ve raised $1.2 million. It’s worth it when they hold up the giant checks and hand them to representatives from Blessings in a Backpack and the Evanston Community Foundation. It’s worth it when balloons fall from the ceiling and you’ve been up for 48 hours and dancing for 30 of them and your feet hurt like they’ve never hurt before and you’re so proud to have made it, because you’ve made it this far and all you can think about is how to keep going.


As the event was ending, one of the leaders on stage — it was difficult to see who through all the movement — said, “Take these lessons that you’ve learned inside the tent, take what you’ve learned about yourself, about perseverance, about hard work and dedication and strength, and bring them with you outside the tent.”


I considered these words. I thought about all the moments that had led to this one, the moments of pain or exhaustion or excitement or hope. But most of all I thought about the important and simple act of sticking with something, of truly devoting yourself to being where you need to be and feeling present. I thought about how that’s really all it takes to accomplish the goals we set for ourselves, the brutal, impossible goals that push us to exhaustion. That maybe you just need to find a way to be there, to put in the time and effort for the things that really matter, in order to make a difference. And then, finally, you can go back to your dorm room and sleep.


To learn more about Dance Marathon, go to nudm.org.

_ERR8162.jpgCHICAGO --- For women suffering from stage-4 breast cancer, there is a new treatment plan that, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine clinical trial, is highly effective and has minimal toxicity. The treatment includes a drug recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

The study combined palbociclib and fulvestrant to treat women with recurrent metastatic (advanced) breast cancer who are resistant to standard endocrine therapy. Patients who were treated with the two drugs experienced significantly longer periods of progression-free survival than those who received a placebo-plus-fulvestrant treatment.

 

“This is a significant achievement because patients who fail to respond to endocrine therapy usually require chemotherapy for treatment with a compromise on quality of life,” said first author Dr. Massimo Cristofanilli, professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine oncologist. “The current study provides an effective and less toxic option for the most common type of metastatic breast cancer.”

 

“The patients in this study who received the combination treatment experienced a better quality of life than those who received the standard endocrine therapy. The study also included patients  who received chemotherapy,” said Cristofanilli, who is also the associate director for precision medicine and translational research at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. This treatment, he said, also comes without chemotherapy’s typical side effects, which may include complete hair loss and neuropathy, which is numbness or pain from nerve damage.

 

The study was published in Lancet Oncology on March 2.

 

A woman’s estrogen can sometimes fuel breast cancer, and endocrine therapy works to block the estrogen. The study focused on women who may have been previously resistant to endocrine treatment and had, in some cases, received chemotherapy. Additionally, this was the first time this combination of drugs had been tested in premenopausal women, who previously had very few treatment options.

 

Cristofanilli studied 521 women from 144 centers across 17 countries, 18 years and older, who had endocrine-resistant, hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Over the 10-month, phase 3 clinical trial between 2013 and 2014, patients were randomly assigned to receive two drugs, palbociclib and fulvestrant, or a placebo and fulvestrant.

 

Patients who received the combined-drug treatment experienced, on average, 9.5 months of progression-free survival compared with 4.6 months for the control group, a difference of 4.9 months.

 

“For women living with breast cancer, prolonged disease control may translate into improved survival, and this is as close as we can get to a cure,” Cristofanilli said. “For now, we are hoping to get to the point where breast cancer is a chronic disease that we can continue to treat for a long time, and this drug gives an important additional option for women with estrogen-positive metastatic breast cancer.”

 

The study was funded by Pfizer and followed an initial analysis from December 2014. Cristofanilli was an unpaid member of the steering committee.

 

Read more on Northwestern News. >>

NewsEvents_Graphics_Trust_390x219.jpg3/1/2016 - Kellogg has launched The Trust Project at Northwestern University, which will bring decades of research about this complex concept into the hands and heads of academics and business leaders alike.

 

The first phase of the project, which launched March 1, features the debut of nearly 30 brief videos on the subject, bringing varying perspectives from Northwestern scholars as well as business experts. The videos are housed together on the project’s website, and are searchable by topic, discipline or contributor.

 

“The purpose of the project is to advance the level of discussion on trust,” says Kent Grayson, the faculty coordinator for the project and an associate professor of marketing. The project emphasizes that understanding and exploring trust have become increasingly vital as technology and globalization erase boundaries between people, organizations and markets.

 

Drawing from broad expertise

 

The project stemmed from cross-disciplinary collaborations between Grayson and others at Northwestern that started in the early 2000s, and were catalyzed by the Kellogg Markets and Customers Initiative's decision to invest heavily in this area. Together with others in the initiative and beyond, Grayson and a project team worked with several prominent Northwestern scholars to develop The Trust Project to showcase collective expertise on this topic in one place.

 

"The wonderful thing about this project is that not only is trust critically important for businesses, which deal with trust issues on a day-to-day basis with customers, suppliers, workforce and other stakeholders,” says Thomas Hubbard, Faculty Director of Kellogg's Strategic Initiatives, “it is also a topic where many academic disciplines can provide complementary insights that can help business leaders address these issues."

 

Two examples of the broad range of project contributors include Adam Waytz, an associate professor of management and organizations at Kellogg, who explores the psychological foundations of trust and how technological innovation relates to trust-building; and Kelly Michelson, MD, MPH, an associate professor of pediatrics at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, who discusses the critical role of communication, especially empathetic listening, in building trust in health care contexts.

 

“I can’t remember the last time I was involved in a project with so many people from so many different disciplines,” says Michelson. “Even more interesting, I think, is that this project focuses on the area of trust. It is not the first topic that might come to mind for a project like this, and it wasn’t necessarily something I intended to study, but it’s a common aspect of our humanity, and something that comes up again and again in my work.”

 

The Trust Project is more than an academic pursuit, however. Contributors like Larry Rosen, CEO of Harry Rosen, Inc., Canada’s largest quality menswear retailer, bring practical insights that significantly enrich the project.

 

“Including business leaders’ perspectives brings a broader view of the ways trust plays into our everyday decisions,” Grayson says. “Not only does this interdisciplinary approach demonstrate that Northwestern is at the leading edge of academic thinking, it also highlights how academic research influences and shapes business practice.”

 

Subsequent phases may include new videos and other media, as well as opportunities to convene and continue the discussion.

 

A Shared Human Experience

 

Because trust is a basic aspect of everyday human existence, the project’s research and resulting videos are useful to more than business leaders and academics.

 

“Everyone who enters into relationships, whether personal or professional, makes important decisions relating to trust every day,” Grayson says.

 

Recognizing this common ground and bringing people together to consider the topic is essentially the project’s mission.

 

“I hope that when people hear about the project,” says Grayson, “they’ll say, ‘I think about trust a lot myself—I wonder what I can learn by hearing how other people think about it?’ If one of our contributor videos gets someone to think about trust in a different way, then we’ve accomplished our mission.”

 

Read more in Kellogg News & Events. >>

WAA_MU_Girls_vs_Boys_7_10.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- Northwestern University alumnus and award-winning Broadway performer Brian d’Arcy James -- co-star of the critically acclaimed 2016 Oscar-winning film “Spotlight” -- will return to the Evanston campus this spring to accept the Sarah Siddons Society’s prestigious annual Actor of the Year Award.

 

James, and Sutton Foster, another popular Broadway performer, will be this year’s award recipients. The 8 p.m. Monday, May 16, benefit ceremony will take place at Northwestern’s Pick-Staiger Concert Hall, 50 Arts Circle Drive, on the University’s Evanston campus. (More on both performers follows).

 

Benefit tickets are $100 for the general public and $25 for students. For reservations visit www.sarahsiddonssociety.org or call 847-467-4000. Tickets are available for purchase at the  Bienen School Concert Office at Pick-Staiger Concert Hall.

 

The benefit is co-sponsored by Northwestern’s School of Communication. All of the event proceeds will support the Sarah Siddons Society’s scholarship fund for theatre students at Columbia College Chicago, DePaul University, Northwestern and Roosevelt University.

 

In addition to presenting the award to d’Arcy James and Foster, the celebration at Pick-Staiger will include special guest appearances by Northwestern School of Communication Dean Barbara O’Keefe; Jeanine Tesori, a Tony-winning composer, arranger and pianist, as well as School of Communication alumni who are pursuing various theatrical careers nationally and locally; and a video message by Andrew Lippa, a New York-based American composer, lyricist, book writer, performer and producer.

 

On award’s night, Kate Baldwin, Northwestern alumna and Tony-nominated actress, will introduce d’Arcy James. Baldwin was nominated for a Tony Award for her performance in “Finian’s Rainbow.” She was last seen in Chicago in Andrew Lippa’s musical “Big Fish.” Baldwin also has been cast in the role of Anna, the feisty teacher, in the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s spring 2016 production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “The King and I,” from April 29 through May 22.

 

Tesori, who will introduce Foster during the ceremony, has written several hit Broadway shows, including the Tony Award-winning musicals “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” “Shrek: The Musical” and her recent  “Violet,” all starring Foster.

 

Tesori has been praised by critics for two of her more serious works, including “Violet,” a musical “that follows a scarred woman who embarks on a cross-country bus trip to be healed by a minister and discovers the true meaning of beauty along the way,” and last year’s Tony-winning musical, “Fun Home,” based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir with the same title, about her dysfunctional family. The producer of that work, Barbara Whitman, also will be on hand for the Siddons’ celebration.

 

Chicago artists and Northwestern alumni taking part in the program will include singer and performer Christine Mild; composer, lyricist and singer Michael Mahler; performer Devin DeSantis; and actor, singer and dancer Will Skrip. Mild and Mahler were Siddons Scholarship winners like d’Arcy James.

 

Several current students from Northwestern’s Music Theatre Program also will be featured, with music direction by Ryan T. Nelson, the music director for Northwestern’s Virginia Wadsworth Wirtz Center for the Performing Arts, and music supervisor for the American Music Theatre Project.

 

Northwestern Professor Emeritus Dominic Missimi, the Sarah Siddons’ artistic director, will produce and stage the award program and serve as co-host for the event with David H. Bell, professor of music theatre.

 

Missimi is the former director of the School of Communication’s Music Theatre Program and the recently retired executive director of the University’s American Music Theatre Project.

 

Bell also is a professional director who has worked extensively all over the world, including on- and off-Broadway. He currently heads the Northwestern Music Theatre Program and is director of the School of Communication’s famed Waa-Mu Show (pictured).

 

Brian d’Arcy James

 

As an undergraduate theater major at Northwestern University, d’Arcy James received a Sarah Siddons Society’s Scholarship in 1989. He is the society’s first scholarship winner to be awarded the prestigious annual Actor of the Year award, initially won in 1953 by American actress Helen Hayes (1900-1993), whose career spanned nearly 80 years, and who many referred to as the “First Lady of American Theatre.”

 

Currently starring on Broadway in the hit musical comedy “Something Rotten,” d’Arcy James has appeared in more than 20 Broadway productions. He has been nominated for a Tony Award three times, including for his current role of Nick Bottom in “Something Rotten.”

 

Theater audiences also have enjoyed his performances in “Titanic,” “Sweet Smell of Success,” “The Apple Tree” and “Shrek: The Musical” (opposite co-star Sutton Foster, who portrayed Fiona). He also won critical acclaim for his performances in Andrew Lippa’s “Wild Party” and in the stage drama “Time Stands Still.”

 

On screen, d’Arcy James is featured as one of the investigative reporters for the Boston Globe in the 2016 Oscar-winning film “Spotlight.”

 

Sutton Foster

 

Foster, a multiple award-winning actress, singer and dancer, has performed in 11 Broadway productions -- most recently in the revival of “Violet” -- and originated roles in the Broadway productions of “The Drowsy Chaperone,” “Little Women,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Shrek: The Musical,” and her performances in “Anything Goes” and “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” for which she won Tony awards.

 

Foster was first seen on television on “Star Search” at age 15, and has more recently appeared in “Bunheads,” “Psych,” “Johnny and the Sprites,” “Flight of the Conchords,” “Sesame Street,”  “Law and Order SVU” and “Royal Pains.” Since March 2015, she stars in TV Land’s new series “Younger,” created by Darren Star.

 

As a solo artist, she has performed nationally and internationally with her musical director Michael Rafter -- featuring songs from her debut solo CD “Wish” as well as her follow up CD, “An Evening With Sutton Foster: Live at the Café Carlyle.” Foster has appeared on the stages of New York’s Carnegie Hall, Feinstein’s/54 Below, Lincoln Center’s American Songbook series, Joe’s Pub and many others. More on Foster is available online.

 

Sarah Siddons Society

 

For more than 60 years, the Sarah Siddons Society has presented the Actor of the Year award to celebrated stage and film actors, including Bette Davis, Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris, Carol Channing, Colleen Dewhurst, Jessica Tandy, Liza Minnelli, Julie Andrews, Bernadette Peters, Patti Lupone, Bebe Neuwirth, Audra McDonald and Jessie Mueller. Many of Chicago’s finest actresses have received the Society’s Leading Lady Award, including Hollis Resnik, Barbara Robertson, Mary Beth Fisher and E. Faye Butler, to name a few.

 

Read more on Northwestern News. >>

financial aid.jpg


Northwestern will significantly increase financial aid for its students, eliminate loans for incoming undergraduate students and provide University-funded scholarships to undocumented students who are graduates of U.S. high schools, Northwestern President Morton Schapiro announced March 3.

 

The changes, which also include increased financial assistance for graduate students and a limit on the amount of loans undergraduate students may have upon graduation, are already in place or will go into effect at the start of the 2016-17 school year, President Schapiro said.


“Northwestern University has always sought to attract the best students in the world and provide them with the financial support needed to obtain a Northwestern education,” President Schapiro said. “Our key priorities include enhancing existing financial aid and developing new programs that will enable even more students who are from low- and middle-income families and who are first-generation college students to attend Northwestern.”


A key part of the initiative is increased aid for undergraduate students. In the past five years, Northwestern has boosted financial aid for undergraduate students by 55 percent to approximately $160 million in 2016-17. The number of enrolled students eligible for federal Pell grants, which are available to students from low-income families, has increased to approximately 15 percent of last fall’s entering first-year class.


“Our goal is to have 20 percent of the entering class be Pell-eligible by the year 2020,” President Schapiro said. “Northwestern is committed to increasing access for academically qualified students, regardless of their economic background.”


The funds for the additional financial assistance will come from gifts to the University, endowment earnings and other sources. A total of $147.2 million in scholarship funding already has been contributed to the University through We Will. The Campaign for Northwestern.


For U.S. undergraduate students, Northwestern is one of a relatively small number of colleges and universities that are “need-blind,” meaning it considers students for admission without taking into account their ability to pay. Northwestern also meets full need, meaning that after a student’s ability to pay is calculated, the University provides all the funds necessary to cover the costs above what the student’s family is able to pay.

Key initiatives that Northwestern is now undertaking include:


  • All-grant financial aid packages. Beginning next fall, all entering first-year students who qualify for Northwestern grant assistance will be awarded aid packages without any loans. Their aid offer will include only grants, scholarships, summer earnings expectations and a work-study job opportunity. The all-grant aid package would enable students to graduate without incurring debt for their main educational expenses.


  • A cap on loan indebtedness for current students. Beginning with the 2016-17 academic year, Northwestern will award its Debt Cap Scholarship to Northwestern scholarship recipients who have need-based loans in excess of $20,000. Eligible students will be awarded the Debt Cap Scholarship in place of the loan component of their financial aid award.


  • Increased financial aid for undocumented students who are graduates of U.S. high schools. Beginning with next fall’s entering class, Northwestern will provide significantly increased financial assistance to academically qualified undocumented students who attended and graduated from a U.S. high school. Even though they have graduated from U.S. high schools, undocumented students are not eligible for federal grants and loans or State of Illinois grants. Northwestern now will provide the same University-funded scholarship assistance to qualified undocumented students that it does to U.S. citizens, using private funds to provide financial aid to support their studies.


“An increasing number of outstanding high school students are those who were brought to the U.S. as small children after being born in another country. Despite Congressional efforts to make college accessible and affordable to these students through the DREAM Act, this bill has not yet been enacted. Therefore, as part of its efforts to reach out to underserved communities, Northwestern will provide increased funds to enable these students to come here,” President Schapiro said.


  • Increased financial support for undergraduate research experiences, unpaid internships and study abroad. Northwestern is making additional funds available for undergraduate students to participate in research projects, do internships or study abroad. The University will increase funding for such experiences.


  • Replacement of lost MAP funding. The Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP), which provides tuition grants for low- and middle-income students, is not currently funded due to the lack of a state budget. Northwestern has assured all of its full-time undergraduate students that the University will replace the lost MAP funding with University funds this year. Approximately 500 Northwestern undergraduates receive a total of about $2.4 million in MAP grants.


“We continue to hope that the governor and the legislature can reach an agreement on a FY2016 budget and restore MAP funding, which supports Illinois students. In order to enable our students to continue without incurring additional costs, Northwestern will stretch its institutional resources to make up for the lost state funds,” President Schapiro said.


  • Increased stipends for graduate students. Starting this academic year, Northwestern increased the base stipend paid to Ph.D. and MFA students in the Graduate School by 26 percent, to $29,000 a year. The move was designed to enhance the quality of student life for graduate students.


  • Increased financial aid for international students. A portion of the $100 million gift made by alumna Roberta Buffett Elliott ’54 last year will help endow scholarships for international students. Up to $20 million of the gift could be used as a matching challenge grant to donors who will endow scholarships benefiting international students.


  • Increased financial assistance for law school students and young alumni. Northwestern Pritzker School of Law recently unveiled a series of initiatives to make law school more affordable and support recent law grads. Funded through giving by law school alumni and friends, including the historic $100 million gift from J.B. and M.K. Pritzker, the initiatives include assisting students with interest payments on loans incurred during law school, providing support for summer public interest internships and other measures.


  • Increased emphasis on financial aid for medical students. Currently about 50 percent of Feinberg School of Medicine students receive some type of scholarship support. Increasing scholarship support is a top fundraising priority for Feinberg in order to reduce the amount of debt that medical students incur, thereby allowing them to choose a career path determined by interest rather than potential income.


  • Increasing scholarships for business students. Across its various programs, the Kellogg School of Management has increased scholarships for students. Those efforts to provide additional support will continue.


“These new initiatives, along with other programs already in place, reaffirm the University’s commitment to making a Northwestern education accessible to qualified students from all economic backgrounds,” President Schapiro said. “We will continue to strengthen our efforts to make Northwestern a welcoming and inclusive community for all students.”


Read the full story at Northwestern News.

GFagan.jpgDance visionary Garth Fagan came to Northwestern University on Friday, Feb. 19, for a visit that was billed “A Conversation.” By the time it was over, Fagan had discussed his life in dance, but he also tossed in a little sermon on creativity and a plea for artistic commitment.

 

The event, co-sponsored by the Department of Theatre and Program in Dance, was held at the Josephine Louis Theater and moderated by Bonnie Brooks, associate professor of dance at Columbia College and a longtime friend of Fagan’s.

 

In her introduction, Brooks recounted Fagan’s numerous awards (including a Tony), his many and varied works (more than 70), his birthplace (Kingston, Jamaica), and his journey to dance, which included a stint studying psychology at Wayne State University.

 

Of course he didn’t become a psychologist, “But I’m sure you used those skills,” Brooks joked.

 

“With dancers,” Fagan said with devilish enthusiasm. “Yes, yes, yes.”

 

Fagan, 75, has been called a “trailblazer” and a “risk taker” throughout his career. He worked at several dance companies in Detroit in his 20s and moved to Rochester, N.Y., in 1970 where he formed his first company, now called Garth Fagan Dance. It was there, over the past 45 years, that he has built utterly original work that led to rich collaborations (Griot New York) and worldwide acclaim (The Lion King).

 

His passion for originality is one of his driving forces. “I love movement invention,” he said. “What you’re going to see on my stage is movement you’ve never seen before and didn’t think was possible. … I like to take a ‘jazz’ approach to movement.”

 

He urged students to build a spirit of artistic expression by listening “to the ideas in your head.”

 

“Listen to the pangs of excitement that you get in your soul,” he said. “Then try that out. But put a different spin on it. It’s your story, your ideas.”

 

Fagan encouraged students to leap for the stars. “It’s such a delicious feeling to be out there flying and not worrying about where you’re going to land,” he said. “Where else can you get that feeling? Standing still? No! … And that’s what’s good about dance.”

 

But Fagan also said that the best dancers are those who are aware of the world around them. They can draw influences from sports, from religion and from current events. “Intelligent dancers who are aware of what’s happening, they make the best dancers to me,” he said. “You can’t stay focused only on dance. You have to know what’s happening in the world. You have to have some opinions. … You can’t be in a vacuum.”

 

Friday’s visit included video excerpts of some of Fagan’s work, including his collaboration with jazzman and composer Wynton Marsalis and celebrated sculptor Martin Puryear from their critically acclaimed Griot New York. Northwestern dance students also performed a small preview of the Danceworks 2016 program. The piece they performed is an excerpt of Two Pieces of One: Green, which was choreographed by Fagan in 2008.

 

To his audience of about 50 students of dance, Fagan offered some words of encouragement — and advice.

 

“College is such a wonderful time,” he said. “A time for experimentation; good experimentation. … (But) stay away from these modern-day drugs – these synthetic drugs – that are killing you and damaging you. “

 

“But keep dancing,” Fagan added. “I love to have bright students following in my footsteps, doing my work. Hallelujah.”

 

Danceworks 2016 (Feb. 26-March 6), will feature the work of Fagan, Northwestern’s Dance Program director Joel Valentín-Martínez, 2015 Guggenheim Fellow Rosy Simas, Hedwig Dances Artistic Associate Maray Gutiérrez, and Northwestern Dance faculty member Jeff Hancock.

 

By Mark Wollemann


Read more in Northwestern School of Communication news. >>

weismantel175.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- Northwestern University professors Mary Weismantel (pictured) and Ryan Dohoney have received The Alumnae of Northwestern University Award for Curriculum Development. They will spend the summer developing two new undergraduate courses designed to draw connections and insights between historical and modern traditions in music and art.

 

The awards are administered by the Office of the Provost and provide funds in the amount of $12,500 to support the development of innovative course materials and new modes of teaching over the summer in preparation for the upcoming academic year.

 

Weismantel, professor of anthropology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, will develop a course to learn about art and architecture through the context of Native American educational and cultural traditions, environmental sustainability and issues of diversity, inequality and politics.

 

Dohoney, assistant professor of musicology in the Bienen School of Music, will develop a course to better understand rare, novel and experimental musical scores through performance and research in the university’s archives.

 

Drawing connections between past and present art and music, each of these courses will encourage students to consider important historical and cultural contributions to their disciplines.

 

The two courses embody the innovation that is paramount for recipients of The Alumnae Award for Curriculum Development. Through the interdisciplinary nature of Weismantel’s approach to ancient cultural ties to modern art, and Dohoney’s connective incorporation of historical and contemporary experimental music traditions, these classes will help to grow and strengthen the undergraduate curriculum at Northwestern in creative ways.

 

Art of the Ancient Americas

 

Weismantel’s course will replace Art History 228: Pre-Columbian Art. With an expanded and updated syllabus, this course will allow students to enroll for credit in art history as well as anthropology and Latin American studies.

 

The class will introduce students to the deep cultural heritage of the Americas through their connection to modern art and architecture. Additionally, the class will allow students to connect with an image-based syllabus rather than relying mainly on text.

 

“This course fills a lacuna in American education, in which we do not learn the deep history of our own continent” Weismantel said. “Students recognize this and value it.”

 

Weismantel is eager to respond to student requests for Native American/indigenous studies courses. She also is hopeful that her class will “validate the cultural heritage of many of our students of color, and (give) students from European, Asian and other backgrounds a basic familiarity with Latino, Latin American and Native American culture and history.”

 

Experimental Music in Theory and Practice

 

In his course, Dohoney will help students discover U.S. and European experimental traditions in music as both scholars and performers, allowing them to learn from Chicago’s contemporary musical community and from archived works in Northwestern’s Deering Library.

 

Dohoney has noticed a shift in the current musical landscape. He hopes that his new course will help build a sustainable curriculum that supports the vision of the Bienen Institute for New Music, in addition to helping build a foundation for students’ future musical ventures.

 

“Over the past three years, I’ve become more involved in the city’s new music scene as a performer and concertgoer,” Dohoney said. “It’s clear that something amazing is happening right now in Chicago. I want (my students) to learn both the history of experimental practice and its living presence in our city.”

 

Dohoney would like to help students devise career strategies and develop practical skills that will empower them to thrive in the contemporary musical climate by connecting them with historical experimental music traditions and members of Chicago’s experimental music community.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

_ERR6276.jpgThe following memo was sent March 3, 2016, to members of the Northwestern University community from President Morton Schapiro and Provost Daniel Linzer.

 

We are very pleased to announce that Northwestern University will significantly increase financial aid for our students, eliminate loans for incoming undergraduate students and provide University-funded scholarships to undocumented students who are graduates of U.S. high schools. Northwestern has always sought to attract the best students in the world and provide them with the financial support needed to obtain a Northwestern education. As we develop our budget for the coming year, our key priorities include enhancing existing financial aid and developing new programs that will enable even more students who are from low- and middle-income families and who are first-generation college students to attend Northwestern.

 

A key part of the initiative is increased aid for undergraduate students. In the past five years, Northwestern has boosted financial aid for undergraduate students by 55 percent to approximately $160 million in 2016-17. The number of enrolled students eligible for federal Pell grants, which are available to students from low-income families, has increased to approximately 15 percent of last fall’s entering first-year class. Our goal is to have 20 percent of the entering class be Pell-eligible by the year 2020, as Northwestern is committed to increasing access for academically qualified students, regardless of their economic background.

 

The funds for the additional financial assistance will come from gifts to the University, endowment earnings and other sources. A total of $147.2 million in scholarship funding has already been contributed to the University through We Will. The Campaign for Northwestern.

 

For U.S. undergraduate students, Northwestern is one of a relatively small number of colleges and universities that are “need-blind,” meaning it considers students for admission without taking into account their ability to pay. Northwestern also meets full need, meaning that after a student’s ability to pay is calculated, the University provides all the funds necessary to cover the costs above what the student’s family is able to pay.


Key initiatives that Northwestern is now undertaking include:


  • All-grant financial aid packages. Beginning next fall, all entering first-year students who qualify for Northwestern grant assistance will be awarded aid packages without any loans. Their aid offer will include only grants, scholarships, summer earnings expectations and a work-study job opportunity. The all-grant aid package would enable students to graduate without incurring debt for their main educational expenses.
  • A cap on loan indebtedness for current students. Beginning with the 2016-17 academic year, Northwestern will award its Debt Cap Scholarship to Northwestern scholarship recipients who have need-based loans in excess of $20,000. Eligible students will be awarded the Debt Cap Scholarship in place of the loan component of their financial aid award.
  • Increased financial aid for undocumented students who are graduates of U.S. high schools. Beginning with next fall’s entering class, Northwestern will provide significantly increased financial assistance to academically qualified undocumented students who attended and graduated from a U.S. high school. Even though they have graduated from U.S. high schools, undocumented students are not eligible for federal grants and loans or State of Illinois grants. Northwestern will now provide the same University-funded scholarship assistance to qualified undocumented students that it does to U.S. citizens, using private funds to provide financial aid to support their studies. An increasing number of outstanding high school students are those who were brought to the U.S. as small children after being born in another country. Despite Congressional efforts to make college accessible and affordable to these students through the DREAM Act, this bill has not yet been enacted. Therefore, as part of its efforts to reach out to underserved communities, Northwestern will provide increased funds to enable these students to come here.
  • Increased financial support for undergraduate research experiences, unpaid internships and study abroad. Northwestern is making additional funds available for undergraduate students to participate in research projects, do internships or study abroad. The University will increase funding for such experiences.
  • Replacement of lost MAP funding. The Illinois Monetary Award Program (MAP), which provides tuition grants for low- and middle-income students, is not currently funded due to the lack of a state budget. Northwestern has assured all of its full-time undergraduate students that the University will replace the lost MAP funding with University funds this year. Approximately 500 Northwestern undergraduates receive a total of about $2.4 million in MAP grants. We continue to hope that the governor and the legislature can reach an agreement on a FY2016 budget and restore MAP funding, which supports Illinois students. In order to enable our students to continue without incurring additional costs, Northwestern will stretch its institutional resources to make up for the lost state funds.
  • Increased stipends for graduate students. Starting this academic year, Northwestern increased the base stipend paid to Ph.D. and MFA students in the Graduate School by 26 percent, to $29,000 a year. The move was designed to enhance the quality of student life for graduate students. Increased financial aid for international students. A portion of the $100 million gift made by alumna Roberta Buffett Elliott ’54 last year will help endow scholarships for international students. Up to $20 million of the gift could be used as a matching challenge grant to donors who will endow scholarships benefiting international students.
  • Increased financial assistance for law school students and young alumni. Northwestern Pritzker School of Law recently unveiled a series of initiatives to make law school more affordable and support recent law grads. Funded through giving by law school alumni and friends, including the historic $100 million gift from J.B. and M.K. Pritzker, the initiatives include assisting students with interest payments on loans incurred during law school, providing support for summer public interest internships and other measures.
  • Increased emphasis on financial aid for medical students. Currently about 50 percent of Feinberg School of Medicine students receive some type of scholarship support. Increasing scholarship support is a top fundraising priority for Feinberg in order to reduce the amount of debt that medical students incur, thereby allowing them to choose a career path determined by interest rather than potential income.
  • Increasing scholarships for business students. Across its various programs, the Kellogg School of Management has increased scholarships for students. Those efforts to provide additional support will continue.


These new initiatives, along with other programs already in place, reaffirm the University’s commitment to making a Northwestern education accessible to qualified students from all economic backgrounds. With your assistance, we also will continue to strengthen our efforts to make Northwestern a welcoming and inclusive community for all students.


Thank you.


Morton Schapiro, President and Professor


Daniel Linzer, Provost and Professor


Read the full memo in Northwestern News. >>

davis175.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- Orbert Davis (pictured), an Emmy Award-winning musician and co-founder of the Chicago Jazz Philharmonic, and Howard Tullman, CEO of the digital startup hub 1871, will highlight a day of presentations from prominent Northwestern alumni and faculty on a variety of subjects during “A Day with Northwestern.”

 

Presented by the Northwestern Alumni Association (NAA) and open to the public, the day of events will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 9, at Norris University Center, 1999 Campus Drive, on the Evanston campus.

 

Davis, who earned a master’s degree in jazz pedagogy from the Henry and Leigh Bienen School of Music in 1997, will share his advice for living a rewarding life in the present by using past experiences to maximize future potential. He’ll do so by reflecting on his own “mission-driven” career, which began with Davis trying to make it in the music industry and led to him becoming a leader of Chicago’s arts and culture community. Davis’ presentation will include video and musical examples.

 

Tullman, who received a bachelor’s degree in economics from Northwestern in 1967 and a law degree from the University in 1970, will deliver a rapid-fire review of the major technology trends that are radically changing the ground rules that determine how businesses reach and engage consumers. Tullman will draw upon his 45 years of experience, which include starting a dozen high-tech companies and building a space for startups to grow and learn together at 1871.

 

For more than 45 years, “A Day with Northwestern” has drawn hundreds of alumni, students, parents and friends for hourlong presentations and lectures on timely topics from prominent Northwestern faculty and alumni. In addition to the keynote presentations from Davis and Tullman, this year’s attendees can attend three of the event’s 12 other presentations on topics including economics, the intersection of food and technology, capital punishment and more.

 

“A Day with Northwestern” showcases the very best of the University and the priorities of We Will. The Campaign for Northwestern.

 

Since space is limited and a large crowd is expected, interested participants are encouraged to register early online. Registration fees, which include admission to the two keynotes, a choice of three breakout sessions and a boxed lunch, vary. Free parking is available in the Segal Visitors Center garage, 1841 Sheridan Road.

 

A full schedule of programs and presenters is available online. For more information, contact the NAA at 800-NU-ALUMS or 847-491-7975 or by sending an email to alumnieducation@northwestern.edu.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

image_handler.jpgColumbus, Ohio – No. 5 Northwestern capped off an impressive weekend by taking home first place at the Midwest Conference Championships in Columbus, Ohio, beating out the host Buckeyes for the program's first conference title since 2001.

 

The Wildcats topped No. 6 Ohio State 785-780 in the final team standings thanks to first place finishes from the epee and saber squads and a third place finish from the foil. The championship is head coach Laurie Schiller's fourth overall and continues his 22-year run of top-three finishes.

 

Both the epee and saber squads defeated Ohio State 5-3 in the final to win their 16-team brackets while the foil group defeated Chicago 5-0 in the bracket's third place match. The foil squad boasts a 34-12 record, while the saber squad is a similarly impressive 35-10. This year's epee team has posted a dominant 45-3 record.

 

In addition to the team success, the Wildcats excelled in the individual tournaments. In the epee bracket, Courtney Dumas, Juliana Barrett, and Mandeep Bhinder swept the top three spots in that order. Helen Foster captured fifth and Anna Tolley finished eighth. Dumas secured her first Midwest Conference title, and her record this season is an astounding 77-12.

 

Alisha Gomez-Shah won the gold medal in the saber bracket, while Cindy Oh took home the silver. Sacha Bazzal also had an eighth place finish. Gomez-Shah's first Midwest Conference title added onto her 46-11 record this year.

 

In foil, Yvonne Chart tied for a third place finish and Stephanie Chan finished sixth. Chart's bronze medal came in her first-ever conference competition.

 

At the tournament, the MFC named its all-conference honors based on order of finishes in the individual tournament. First through fourth place was first-team all-conference, fifth through eighth was second-team, and ninth through twelfth earned honorable mention. In addition to the fencers named above, Ella Lombard, Katie Van Riper, Mikela Goldstein, Stefani Kahookele, Kimmy Fishman, Julia Abelsky, and Anna Parzecki all captured honorable mentions in their weapon groups.

 

The Wildcats' remarkable season will continue on March 12, at the NCAA Midwest Regional Tournament in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Read more in Northwestern Sports News. >>

Mustanski-Brian-214x300.jpgNorthwestern University has launched the Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing (ISGMH), the first research institute in the United States established university-wide that is focused exclusively on LGBT health.

 

Sexual and gender minorities include lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and gender-non-conforming people – anyone whose sexual or gender identity does not confirm to social majority categories of sexual orientation and gender.

 

“This new institute represents Northwestern and Feinberg’s commitment to support breakthrough research that improves the lives of LGBT people everywhere,” said Eric G. Neilson, MD, vice president for medical affairs and Lewis Landsberg Dean at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “We want to be a leader in reducing health inequalities in LGBT communities.”

 

The mission of the institute is to connect scholars across disciplines to create collaborations and stimulate new research that will improve the health of LGBT people across their lifespans.

 

“We now have an extraordinary window of opportunity to conduct innovative research on the most important health concerns and needs of LGBT populations, to train scientists and clinicians in the best practices to meet those needs and to profoundly lower barriers to healthcare and eliminate inequities in health outcomes, “ said director Brian Mustanski, PhD (pictured), associate professor of Medical Social Sciences.

 

The institute’s research will focus not only on understanding the drivers behind health inequities involving sexual and gender minorities, but also on developing innovative programs to address those inequities with interventions that are rigorous and evidence-based. For example, Mustanski is currently evaluating an online program he pioneered to prevent HIV that targets young gay and bisexual men, a population in which HIV infection rates continue to increase, even as overall rates in the Unites States remain stable.

 

“While the struggle for LGBT equality and the study of LGBT health are not new, developments during the last several years, including the exceptional increases in national and local attention to LGBT health, have laid a promising foundation for impactful and groundbreaking research, education and service,” Mustanski said.

 

The Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellness encompasses three programs:

 

  1. The IMPACT LGBT Health and Development Program, led by Mustanski, conducts research exploring the development of sexual orientation and gender identity. IMPACT has been awarded more than $20 million in research funding from the National Institutes of Health and major foundations.
  2. The Evaluation, Data Integration and Technical Assistance Program, led by Gregory Phillips II, PhD, and George Greene, PhD, aims to be a local and national leader in the evaluation of health interventions focused on sexual and gender minorities, with an emphasis on HIV programs.
  3. The Complex Systems and Health Disparities Research Program, led by Michelle Birkett, PhD, focuses on understanding the complex mechanisms driving the health disparities of stigmatized populations, in particular gender and sexual minorities.

 

In addition, the institute plans to develop concentrations on the health of transgender and lesbian people, LGBT families, race and ethnicity, aging and the intersections of these issues.

 

Engaging the community is also a critical component of the ISGMH, and faculty members have partnerships with over a dozen community organizations throughout Chicago. For example, the IMPACT Program within the institute is a resident partner of Center on Halsted, a community center for LGBT people in the Chicago area. The Institute also co-sponsors, with Center on Halsted and Feinberg’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, the nation’s first internship training track focused on the health psychology of LGBT people.


The institute will also disseminate research to a variety of audiences, including LGBT communities, the public at large, scholars, service providers, educators and policymakers.


The ISGMH, a University Research Center at Northwestern, is supported by the Office of the Provost, the Office for Research and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.


“LGBT people experience inequities in many domains of health, but we also show remarkable resiliency and cultural vibrancy,” Mustanski said. “There is much that can be learned from our community to better society.”


Read about the institute's work at isgmh.northwestern.edu, and sign up for the institute's listserv on the site's Contact page.

Feinberg_Bldg_13.jpgCHICAGO --- A new study provides a major link between low levels of vitamin D and aggressive prostate cancer. Northwestern Medicine research showed deficient vitamin D blood levels in men can predict aggressive prostate cancer identified at the time of surgery.

 

The finding is important because it can offer guidance to men and their doctors who may be considering active surveillance, in which they monitor the cancer rather than remove the prostate.

 

“Vitamin D deficiency may predict aggressive prostate cancer as a biomarker,” said lead investigator Dr. Adam Murphy, an assistant professor of urology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine urologist. “Men with dark skin, low vitamin D intake or low sun exposure should be tested for vitamin D deficiency when they are diagnosed with an elevated PSA or prostate cancer. Then a deficiency should be corrected with supplements.“

 

Murphy also is a member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University.

 

Previous studies showing an association between vitamin D levels and aggressive prostate cancer were based on blood drawn well before treatment. The new Northwestern study provides a more direct correlation because it measured D levels within a couple of months before the tumor was visually identified as aggressive during surgery to remove the prostate (radical prostatectomy).

 

The relationship between vitamin D and prostate cancer may explain some disparities seen in prostate cancer, especially among African American men. Prior research by Murphy and colleagues showed African American men who live in low sunlight locations are up to 1½ times more likely to have vitamin D deficiency than Caucasian men.

 

But because vitamin D is a biomarker for bone health and aggressiveness of other diseases, all men should check their levels, Murphy said.

 

“All men should be replenishing their vitamin D to normal levels,” Murphy said. “It’s smart preventive health care.”

 

Aggressive prostate cancer is defined by whether the cancer has migrated outside of the prostate and by a high Gleason score. A low Gleason score means the cancer tissue is similar to normal prostate tissue and less likely to spread; a high one means the cancer tissue is very different from normal and more likely to spread.

 

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Feb. 22.  Murphy collaborated on the study with Rick Kittles, associate director of cancer disparities at the University of Arizona Cancer Center.

 

The study was part of a larger ongoing study of 1,760 men in the Chicago area examining vitamin D and prostate cancer. The current study included 190 men, average age of 64, who underwent a radical prostatectomy to remove their prostate from 2009 to 2014.

 

Of that group, 87 men had aggressive prostate cancer. Those with aggressive cancer had a median level of 22.7 nanograms per milliliter of vitamin D, significantly below the normal level of more than 30 nanograms/milliliter. The average D level in Chicago during the winter is about 25 nanograms/milliliter, Murphy noted.

 

Most people in Chicago should be on D supplements, particularly during winter months, Murphy said. “It’s very hard to have normal levels when you work in an office every day and because of our long winter,” he said.

 

The Institute of Medicine recommends 600 international units of D per day, but Murphy recommends Chicago residents get 1,000 to 2,000 international units per day.

 

The paper is titled: “Associations Between Serum Vitamin D and Adverse Pathology in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.”

 

This work was supported by the following grants: 1R01MD007105-01, National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); IK2CX000926-01, the Veterans Health Administration), W81XWH-10-1-0532 pd22E, the U.S. Department of Defense; and P50 CA090386-10S from the National Cancer Institute of the NIH.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

moravek638.jpgEVANSTON, Ill.  --- Northwestern University senior Jessie Moravek has been named a Luce Scholar to live and work in Asia, where she will investigate how people and cultures are impacted by environmental change.

 

Moravek, who studies environmental science and biology at Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences, was one of 18 young American leaders chosen from 162 candidates. She is the 10th Northwestern student to win the prestigious award from the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

“The Luce Scholarship will give me an international perspective on issues such as climate change and water resource availability,” Moravek said. “ Moving forward, this global view will help me tackle large scale environmental problems with creativity and innovation.”

 

Moravek is especially interested in connecting with people and bringing the human element into her scientific research. During a summer internship at a national forest in Utah, where she analyzed the quality and amount of groundwater for grazing, mining and oil drilling, she experienced firsthand the tension between scientists and local residents.

 

“The more I talked to people about their perspectives, the better I was able to apply my research in the community,” she wrote in her application letter. "For instance, it was easier to talk to ranchers about water and grazing restrictions if I recognized the historic conflicts between ranchers and federal, state and tribal governments over water in the region.”

 

The Utah internship taught Moravek that “the balance between ecosystem conservation and human needs is a critical component of environmental research,” she said.

 

In Asia, Moravek hopes to better understand and communicate different ideologies behind environmental issues, which will be critical to her future environmental research.

 

Raised in the Chicago suburb of St. Charles, Moravek grew up camping and backpacking. She used her love of music to learn about cultures and customs in different environments.

 

In addition to assessing water quality in Utah oilfields, she worked in a carbon laboratory at Northwestern to identify carbon sources that may contribute to climate change. She also spent a semester studying salt marsh ecology at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

 

Through an NOAA Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship, Moravek studied salmon conservation in Seattle, Washington. She presented this work at the Hollings Scholar Symposium in Washington, D.C. and a poster at the American Geophysical Union 2015 Fall Meeting, and she is using the collected data for a senior thesis about salmon habitat restoration.

 

Throughout her research experiences, Moravek has worked to connect with people and their communities. She writes for the campus nature magazine In Our Nature and advises younger environmental students. She is also plays the mellophone in the Northwestern University Marching Band and the viola in the Philharmonia Orchestra.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

schoenfeld175.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. – Long known as the world’s biggest jailer, the United States is experimenting with prison reform.

 

California’s prison downsizing experiment is the nation's largest. But Republican states are the ones leading the way, according to Northwestern University professor Heather Schoenfeld, who is investigating why states are seeking reform and how these efforts might help the U.S. reverse mass incarceration.

 

In the March issue of The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Schoenfeld argues that while California was implementing its reforms, states with “far more conservative credentials,” like Texas and Georgia, were pushing forward with their own unmandated efforts—perhaps even aided by the rise of the Tea Party and its mistrust of big government.

 

“Mass incarceration is essentially a big government program,” said Schoenfeld, a faculty associate at Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research and assistant professor of legal studies and human development and social policy.

 

These Republican-dominated states have set reforms into motion that aim to save money by sending less people to prison and investing in rehabilitative programs to reduce recidivism. In an earlier era, these efforts might have been derided as “soft on crime.”

 

Schoenfeld, a leading scholar on criminal punishment systems, has been researching how some states are responding to the issue and the take-home lessons for other states that are not.

 

“The question I’m interested in is, ‘How are states making these policy decisions now?’” Schoenfeld said.

 

The current issue of The ANNALS represents the first effort by scholars to systematically and scientifically examine what has been described as “the biggest criminal justice experiment ever conducted in America.”

 

Less than five percent of the world’s population lives in the U.S., but America houses 25 percent of the world’s inmates.

 

Over the last decade, lower crime rates, shrinking state budgets and the ballooning costs of caring for more and more inmates have pushed states both red and blue to seek prison reforms.

 

In 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered California to reduce its prison population to comply with constitutional standards. California underwent “Realignment,” which transferred lower-level offenders from state prisons to county systems.

 

The law produced drastic changes in the population and operation of county jail facilities. And thanks to $1 billion in annual state funding, it has led all 58 of California’s counties to experiment on how best to deal with the affected inmates, according to University of California, Irvine researchers Charis Kubrin and Carroll Seron, also writing in the current issue of The ANNALS.

 

Schoenfeld hopes her research framework will lead to a better understanding of why a state like Georgia has embarked on a series of reforms, but not Florida, “which is one of those states where reform is moving very, very slowly,” she said.

 

However, even in states like California and Georgia, “passing reforms is just half the battle,” according to Schoenfeld.

 

In her article, she calls for more research into the implementation of reforms and the measurement of their effects—not only to identify changes to costs and prison populations, but to assess whether they really reduce the size and scope of criminal punishment.

 

After all, she cautions, policymakers consciously created mass incarceration by expanding prison terms for an increasing number of crimes. But the new reforms have done little to address the collateral consequences for families and communities.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

DM_DSC_0418.jpgEVANSTON, Ill. --- For the first time in Northwestern University Dance Marathon’s (NUDM) 42-year-history, funds raised by students the first weekend in March will be used to combat childhood hunger in the Chicago area and across the country.

 

The majority of this year’s net proceeds will benefit a nonprofit organization that provides weekend meals for thousands of needy elementary school students. A portion of the net proceeds will be directed to a local group dedicated to helping Evanston thrive through grants and projects.

 

From March 4 to 6, NUDM will celebrate the conclusion of a yearlong student-run philanthropic effort supporting Blessings in a Backpack and the Evanston Community Foundation (ECF), NUDM 2016’s primary and secondary beneficiaries, respectively.

 

That weekend an energetic group of more than 1,500 undergraduate students will gather at Northwestern’s Norris University Center to dance nonstop for 30 hours to raise funds for both organizations in NUDM’s 42nd annual fundraising event.

 

A live stream of the entire Evanston campus event can be viewed online at www.nudm.org.

 

Blessings in a Backpack is a leading nonprofit child hunger organization that currently feeds more than 85,000 children in 800 schools in 46 states and the District of Columbia. It provides weekend meals for food insecure elementary school students.

 

Every Friday, more than 3,700 Blessings in a Backpack volunteers distribute bags of nutritious and non-perishable weekend food to children. During the week, these kids rely on the  federally-assisted National School Lunch Program for free and reduced price meals in public and nonprofit private schools and residential child care institutions. Without food assistance, many of these children could go up to 65 hours -- from the time they leave school on Friday to when they return Monday morning -- without eating, officials say. This lack of food affects their ability to learn, grown and dream of a brighter future.

 

Backpack food includes easy-to-prepare and ready-to-eat foods, such as granola bars, juice boxes, macaroni and cheese and oatmeal. A donation of $100 will feed one child on the weekends for one 38-week school year through the Blessings in a Backpack program.

 

Hunger affects 46.5 million people in the U. S. Locally, Cook County has the fourth highest rate of hunger in the nation, with close to 300,000 children receiving the government’s free and reduced meal plan in public schools.

 

“When you consider that just $100 feeds a child for an entire school year (of weekends), you realize NUDM has the power to directly impact the overall health and academic performance of thousands of kids,” NUDM 2016 executive co-chair Arielle Miller said.

 

To kick off this year’s NUDM fundraiser and to expand its outreach, last September NUDM invited students from Kellogg School of Management and various student organizations to gather in Northwestern’s Deering Meadow to help pack 200 bags of food for students in need at Lincoln and Dawes Elementary Schools in Evanston and Stagg Elementary School, located on the South Side of Chicago.

 

Other related special fundraising events have included a series of Trivia nights, a Lifesource Blood Drive, a Battle of DJs, and canning for cash donations on Evanston and Skokie streets.

 

Evanston Community Foundation

 

The Evanston Community Foundation, NUDM’s secondary beneficiary since 1998, will receive 10 percent of this year’s NUDM net proceeds.

 

“The Evanston Community Foundation is focused on helping Evanston thrive now and forever as a vibrant, inclusive and just community,” said Monique Brunson Jones, ECF’s new President and CEO.

 

“This means we connect resources and knowledge with the work of local organizations for the common good. We do this by investing in the community through grant making, leadership development and capacity building.”

 

Jones said ECF is grateful for having NUDM as a grant-making partner because it allows ECF to have a greater impact in Evanston. The annual NUDM contribution supports ECF’s responsive grants, community catalyst grants and program assistance for organizations that serve Evanston.

 

“Each year ECF receives grant requests from organizations working across a broad spectrum of program areas like basic human needs, community development, early childhood education, environment, health, housing, seniors, workforce development and family support and counseling. We are grateful to have NUDM 2016 co-chairs Kevin Harris and Arielle Miller serving on the responsive grants committee, helping to choose the organizations that receive funding,” Jones added.

 

Upcoming NUDM 2016 Fundraising Activities

 

  • NUDM 2016 begins at 7 p.m. Friday, March 4, and concludes at 1 a.m. Sunday, March 6, at Norris University Center, 1999 Campus Drive, on the University’s Evanston campus.
  • A Silent Auction online from Friday, Feb. 26 through 1 a.m. Sunday, March 6, can be viewed at www.store.nudm.org/auction.
  • A 5K and 10K run around Northwestern’s scenic “lakefill” begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 5. The pre-registration fee is $25, though runners are encouraged to fundraise more for NUDM and its 2016 beneficiaries.
  • The 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 5 Kids Fair at Norris Center will feature fun, family-oriented activities. Tickets can be purchased at Norris on the day of the event.

 

About Northwestern University Dance Marathon (NUDM)

 

Now in its 42nd year, NUDM is one of the largest entirely student-run philanthropies in the nation. Since 1975, NUDM has raised more than $16 million for more than 30 different charities.

 

Last year, NUDM raised more than $1 million in cash and in-kind donations for the fifth consecutive year in support of Starlight Children’s Foundation -- an organization that partners with experts in healthcare, entertainment and technology to create a unique blend of family-centered services from hospital to home -- and the Evanston Community Foundation (ECF).

 

In 2014, NUDM celebrated its 40th anniversary, and raised a record-breaking $1,385,273 in cash and in-kind donations for Team Joseph, a non-profit organization that funds cutting-edge research to find a treatment or cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy -- and ECF.

 

To learn more, visit www.nudm.org.

 

Read more in Northwestern News. >>

Graduation with Sana.jpgThis week’s Wildcat of the Week features Cori Myers, ’14 MA, a Northwestern staff member within Alumni Relations and Development (ARD).

 

When Cori Myers joined Northwestern in 2011 as a staff member on ARD’s annual giving team, she was looking for a place where she could grow in her career and have a strong sense of community. Little did she know she’d receive all that—and more! Due to Northwestern’s educational assistance benefits, she was able to enroll as a graduate student while working full-time for the University and receive a discounted rate for her graduate studies in Public Policy and Administration through the School of Professional Studies. She reflects:

 

Over the past four years, I’ve enjoyed my time with Alumni Relations and Development. I’ve always had great supervisors that supported me, challenged me, and had my best interest in mind. Each have become a mentor. I also work with great colleagues on Annual Giving and across ARD.

 

Annual Giving is the leader when it comes to reaching Northwestern’s undergraduate participation goal. It’s an exciting time because our team is growing, being challenged, and taking on new initiatives—and it’s working. #CATSGiveBack, Northwestern’s Giving Tuesday campaign, exceeded our goals this past December. It was a long day for many people—but the atmosphere in the room was palpable with excitement: 1,616 donors and $540,771 raised from 49 states and 13 countries.

 

What’s great about Northwestern is the ability to make a gift to any area of the university you choose. I’ve made gifts to the School of Professional Studies, as that is the school I graduated from. Recently I heard Teresa Woodruff, Ph.D. speak at an ARD event; I was so energized and intrigued by the work she is doing, that on Giving Tuesday I made a gift to support her initiatives and the Women’s Health Education Fund.

 

I am currently a bronze-level member in NU Loyal, giving each of the four years I’ve been working at ARD. I’ve been able to attend NU Loyal events and meet other alumni and friends that also give to the university year after year. I love that NU Loyal recognizes those individuals that make a gift—whatever the size—and thanks them for being annual donors.

 

For more information on considering a career within Alumni Relations and Development at Northwestern, view our open positions or sign up to attend an ARD Information Session for prospective candidates.