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Rob Warden, right, the co-founder of the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern's School of Law, poses with exoneree Willie Raines, center, and Karen Daniel, the center's co-director, at a symposium honoring Warden in May. Warden is retiring at the end of August. (Raines was wrongfully convicted of a double murder in 1978.)


Rob Warden, executive director and co-founder of the Center on Wrongful Convictions at Northwestern's School of Law, is retiring at the end of August after a career dedicated to exposing and overturning wrongful convictions.


The center, which opened in 1998, has contributed to the exoneration of dozens of innocent men and women, produced several groundbreaking articles on the causes of wrongful conviction, and blazed a trail of revolutionary reforms.

 

Most notably, the center played a major role in influencing the moratorium on Illinois executions declared by former Gov. George Ryan in January 2000 and his decision to commute all Illinois death sentences in January 2003.


Daniel Rodriguez, dean of the School of Law, commended Warden and his "dedicated, countless contributions to our center, to our law school, and to educating the public about the prevalence and causes of wrongful convictions" at a symposium honoring Warden in May.


Please visit the Northwestern News Center to read more about Warden's career and the legacy he will leave at the Center on Wrongful Convictions.


For more stories from this month's Alumni News, visit the NAA on Our Northwestern, the University's online community.